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WHAT IS TRUE WIRELESS PAIRING? FROM VOLKANO Leave a comment

WHAT IS TRUE WIRELESS PAIRING?
We’re seeing more and more talk of True Wireless and Individual Pairing popping up all over the internet and our audio packages these days, but what does it actually mean? Is it relevant to you, the consumer and how exactly do you benefit from TWS?

HOW DOES BLUETOOTH WORK?
To understand individual pairing, we need to understand traditional Bluetooth pairing.
Pairing happens when you connect a Bluetooth-enabled transmitting device or “transmitting” device, such as your phone, to a “receiving” device, like your headphones. This happens in one of four different ways, Basic or Adapted Piconet Channels, Inquiry Channels or Paging Channels.

Typically headphones and earphones will use a one-way Piconet connection which transmits digital short-range radio over 79 different frequencies (ranging from 2.40 to 2.48GHz) in what’s called “frequency hopping”; it also means that you will very rarely get the same devices interfering with each other as they will likely never be on the same channel.
Sound is then sent through a PSK (Pulse-shift modulation) from your paired device through phasing fixed-frequency carrier waves and interprets sound through varying sine and cosine inputs.

OKAY, BUT WHAT ABOUT TWS?

TWS Earphones are two independent earpieces that are not connected by any wires. Hence, the term true wireless. Each earpiece has its own receiver and each must decode the proper channel (left or right) from the Transmitting device. Further, each earpiece will have its own amplifier which boosts the audio signal.

When you pair just one earpiece to a device, you are essentially taking a stereo set of earphones and turning each bud into its own mono-earpiece which plays both left and right channels at the same time.

To do this with most devices, you simply need to ensure that you only remove one of the earphones from the charging case, or ensure that enough distance is between each earpiece when pairing to different transmitting devices (this is usually around 10m or 33 feet).

Why would you want to pair just one earphone? Perhaps you’re in an office, and you really need to keep one ear out for call, or sharing your earphones with a friend, or just charging one of the buds at a time. You’re limited only by having a Bluetooth-enabled device and your own imagination.

Credit to Volkano

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